Best Scott Cao Violin Reviews 2018

Scott Cao Violins is a company whose instruments are widely acclaimed by famous violinists and introductory teachers alike. They ensure respect of tradition, vintage tonality, and organic, classic design.

While retaining all the features that standard violins have, Scott Cao’s products bear unique qualities that are as innovative as they are practical and noticeable.

Though Scott Cao is a relatively young company (established in 1989), its makers’ craftworks have procured numerous awards, including the “First place award for tone and violin 1990 Violin Maker’s Association of British Columbia” and the “2010 VSA [Competition’s]” “tone award for violin”. Performer Sarah Chang has spoken well in respect to the company: “Wow, huge sound! It’s an incredible violin.”

Best Cecilio Violin Reviews 2018

The violin market – massive, marked up, and murky. Its selection is huge; tens of companies have a share of it. Many of its products are expensive, as some sell for over $4000.

And, often, it feels iffy – items descriptions are similar from one brand to another, and high-quality violins are given the same online displays that less valuable ones have.

Best Mendini Violin Reviews 2018

The best violins are those whose resonance inspires listeners, whose over- and under-tones are gloriously abundant, and that can react to a performer’s every intent motion. They are made of fine woods, carved by master crafters, and given much time and energy to be perfected.

Physical and emotional exertion are all but necessary in the process of making an excellent instrument, and signs of a lack of proper effort are plain and audible.

Violinists such as Hilary Hahn, Joshua Bell, and Sarah Chang certainly take great care in selecting their respective violins, and minute blemishes are likely plain to their ears, eyes, and hands.

In hoping to sell a musical object to celebrities like these, regimented discipline and unbounded artistic ability are needed by the most ambitious individuals.

Violin Mutes: A-Z Buyer’s Guide for Beginners

In addition to quieting the output and dampening the sound, violin mutes add texture to a violin’s output. They can fashion oriental timbres that sound as reeds rustling in a marsh, and can form haunting textures that easily send chills up one’s spine.

They can be used for a variety of circumstances and areas, including hushed practice during a silent night, ambient layering during an orchestral piece, and isolated sections of solo repertoire. Combined with numerous ensemble members, they can serve as the underlying soil of a piece, or as an airy addition to a swaying movement.

Violin vs. Viola: What’s the Difference?

I am often asked by non-music students, by people at lesson shops, or by passers at sidewalk corners, “What is that?” as a finger is pointed toward my instrument case.

My answer varies from one circumstance to the next: “It’s my business partner,” or, “A violin, it is,” or, “It’s a machine-gun,” are potential replies. I might, if the inquirer’s response suggests it, reveal the tool inside, which, lo and behold, is a violin.